North Shore Vibe Presents with Lily Aaron (E-town Sunrise)

Lily Aaron is doing all she can to make Evanston a leader in the battle against climate change.  She has helped educate the mayor, city council, and school board leadership on the challenges future generations will face if action is not taken.  On top of it all, she is only 17 years old.  Lily is a strong advocate for our planet and we are lucky to have her in the North Shore Vibe family!

 

Below are a few links to topics discussed in the video:

Citizens Greener Evanston (CGE)

Sunrise Movement

 

 

 

 

 

Transcript 
Speaker 2 
Ladies and gentlemen welcome to North Shore Vibe presents where we interview. 
Speaker 2 
Incredible people impacting the Chicago North Shore Community. 
Speaker 2 
My name is Jay Townsend. 
Speaker 2 
I am your host and owner of North Shore Vibe and eco friendly apparel brand here to protect Lake Michigan and represent this community 's love for the Lake. 
Speaker 2 
Our guest today is someone special it is a local Evanston resident a climate activist someone that has spent time in front of the mayor, the City Council, the Evanston School board. 
Speaker 2 
Oh and on top of it all, she's only 17 years old. 
Speaker 2 
Our guest today is Lily Aaron. 
Speaker 2 
She is a junior at Evanston Township High School and she is passionate about fighting climate change. 
Speaker 2 
And she is taking action towards making Evanston a leader in the fight against climate change. 
Speaker 2 
And moving towards renewable. 
Speaker 2 
Energy to learn more about the interview check out additional podcasts. Check out our eco friendly apparel visit our website at thenorthshorevibe.com to find out about future beach cleanups visit our events page or check out our Instagram @thenorthshorevibe. Hope you enjoy the interview and we look forward to talking to you again soon. 
Speaker 2 
Welcome to North Shore Vibe presents we have an amazing guest here this morning. 
Speaker 2 
We're on Northwestern University 's campus here by the library. 
Speaker 2 
And I am very pleased and excited to welcome Miss Lily Aaron, little welcome to North Shore Vibe Presents. 
Speaker 1 
 Thank you so much this is such an amazing opportunity. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, how are you this morning feel like we got a little spring weather? 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, I'm doing alright loving the Sunshine Definitely. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, any plans for today after the interview. 
Speaker 1 
Speaker 1 
Got a big english test oh I gotta study for it. 
Speaker 2 
Doesn't stop does? 
Speaker 1 
It no never. 
Speaker 1 
Never. 
Speaker 1 
 
Speaker 2 
Alright well, hopefully this will be a little break from studying we could talk about some fun stuff stuff. 
Speaker 2 
You and I have both passionate about and talk about how we're making some differences. 
Speaker 1 
Sounds good to. 
Speaker 1 
It's me. 
Speaker 1 
 
Speaker 2 
Me so I want to jump right in and we've had the chance to talk on the phone. 
Speaker 2 
A couple of times and get some background, but I actually first came across your name Lily when I was reading. 
Speaker 2 
The daily northwestern paper and saw about a meeting that you had had with Evanston City Council in which. 
Speaker 2 
You spoke up. 
Speaker 2 
In front of a big group of people. 
Speaker 2 
And I understand that there's a little more to that story than what I read in the article so I wanted to start with that talk about what you were doing with some Evanston politicians? 
Speaker 2 
What you guys were trying to accomplish and how it came about that. 
Speaker 2 
You were speaking in front of this. 
Speaker 2 
Group of people. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, so it was my sophomore year. 
Speaker 1 
I'm now junior so pre covid. 
Speaker 1 
But some of the E town sunrise staff were going to speak at City Council to demand. 
Speaker 1 
The implementation of CARP, which is the climate action resilience plan. So basically like Evanston 's version of the Green New deal got it and it had yet to be implemented and it was passed in 2018 and by that point. It was like early 2020. I believe, and they hadn't done anything with it, so I was just going to support. 
Speaker 1 
But then all of a sudden one of the staffers moms comes up to me and she's like Bella, who is one of the leaders had to back out, so would it be Bella Hubbard, so he had to, she's back out an? 
Speaker 1 
They asked if I could speak in her place and I was like and this was like 20 minutes before going up in front of City Council. 
Speaker 1 
So I was kind of scrambling and everything was a little bit improv, but I got up there and I demanded that City Council so all the Alderman would. 
Speaker 1 
I demanded that they would implement CARP and they would do it at a much faster rate than they were doing it and it was definitely definitely nerve wrecking but I got up there and I got. 
Speaker 1 
I'm done. 
Speaker 1 
 
Speaker 2 
It done So what is a City Council meeting like are there? 
Speaker 1 
Done. 
Speaker 1 
 
Speaker 2 
How many people are in a room how? 
Speaker 2 
Any. 
Speaker 2 
Politicians are there from Evanston? 
Speaker 2 
How many other participants are there was the room like? 
Speaker 1 
Oh. 
Speaker 1 
It was packed with a bunch of other Evanston residents who had all their own demands. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, yeah, and also the like 6 to 7 Alderman Board members who yeah a bunch of older. 
Speaker 2 
So it's a full room. 
Speaker 1 
Very white people? 
Speaker 2 
And what were the nerves going through when someone comes up to you 20 minutes before it was like Hey, we need you to advocate for us in about 20 minutes Are you ready? 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, it kind of felt like all the blood drained from my face. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
I was very, very nervous. 
Speaker 1 
I'm not the best public speaker. 
Speaker 1 
So not usually my Forte, but I got it done. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, yeah, you're stretching you're stretching yourself and how did it go? 
 
Uh huh? 
Speaker 1 
I think it went well, it was, I had yet to figure it out, but City Council is actually broadcasted on the network. 
Speaker 1 
I'm not entirely sure of but oh great. 
Speaker 1 
I did have people watching from home, so they did get to videotape it and I saw it when I got home. 
Speaker 2 
Very cool. 
Speaker 2 
And people like myself read about it, yeah, right so you mentioned CARP, the climate action resilience plan. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
 
Speaker 2 
Plan for people who don't know what that is talk to us a little bit about that. You mentioned it was passed in 2018, but things haven't happened yet. What are the demands that we're looking for at a CARP and what are we trying to do to get things going? 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
A little bit so with CARP all about demanding an net zero carbon emissions. 
Speaker 1 
By around 2025/2030 renewable energy, green infrastructure. 
Speaker 1 
I really can't think of half the stuff off the top of my head, but it's really everything that we knew the Green Deal would have encompassed I'm talking about affordable housing and. 
Speaker 1 
Like an urban agriculture and making it so that each and every resident, has access to as climate change continues to become more imminent with flooding. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
An extreme heat like what they need housing wise to make sure that they're stable so. 
 
Sure. 
Speaker 1 
I mean in addition to that there's a bunch of other aspects that need to be expanded upon in carp to make it so that it is as encompassing as we need it to be yeah, so yeah. 
Speaker 2 
Very cool and how did you? 
Speaker 2 
Talk to me, I'm thinking about what I was doing when I was 17 and it was not going in front of City Council advocating for. 
Speaker 2 
Tighter restrictions on. 
Speaker 2 
Emissions or thinking about how we support our community as the Globe starts to heat up and weather becomes more volatile. 
Speaker 2 
How did you? 
Speaker 2 
No. 
Speaker 2 
Tell me what led up to that moment where you're in front of City Council that got you interested in the climate an advocating for others that might not be able to advocate for themselves? 
Speaker 2 
Where did this interest come from. 
Speaker 1 
Well, I've always loved the outdoors. 
Speaker 1 
It's kind of a given. 
Speaker 1 
I think from ages 7 to 14. 
Speaker 1 
I spent two months each summer at Thunderbird camp for Girls, which is like the Super rural intense backpacking camp in Minnesota, and there I really explored my love for the outdoors, so that was really my basis for that. 
Speaker 2 
OK got it. 
Speaker 1 
But after I had grown out of Thunderbird and I was looking for new things, my mom and I actually came up. 
Speaker 1 
On the Internet on this program called Roadd Less traveled where they offered a bunch of different volunteer opportunities an like summer camp, sort of. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
And we signed up for this trip in Bonaire. 
Speaker 1 
Sorry my it was just me. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah but it was. 
 
So. 
Speaker 2 
You went alone to Bonaire and where what is Bonaire? 
Speaker 1 
Yes. 
Speaker 2 
Where is it? 
Speaker 1 
Bonaire is about 45 miles off the coast of Venezuela in the ABC Islands. Got it and I I went as a part of a coral restoration trip. I had the privilege to go an I really learned first hand the extent of the havoc that has been. 
Speaker 2 
Speaker 1 
Linked across these communities that depend. 
Speaker 1 
On the lands for basically every aspect of their livelihood, and you know. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
You look up. 
Speaker 1 
Like coral reefs on Google, and you're presented with these like grand vibrant displays of life and like these amazing eager people. 
Speaker 2 
Alright great color big contrast, yeah. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
And. 
Speaker 1 
I mean I got in the water an it just was not that what did. 
Speaker 2 
It look what did it look. 
Speaker 1 
Like it was just like this white dust. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, and I mean don't get me wrong, it wasn't completely dead, but it certainly wasn't what Google had told me. 
 
Right. 
Speaker 1 
And it was. 
Speaker 1 
Really shocking to me, and. 
Speaker 1 
Once I got home, I mean. 
Speaker 1 
At least from my point of view as. 
Speaker 1 
A white sis girl living in a pretty affluent part of Evanston, where I certainly don't have to face like the same extent of the climate crisis that is in Bonaire. 
Speaker 1 
It's I kind of looked at it as my responsibility to uplift the voices of those who are experiencing the. 
Speaker 1 
Brunt of climate change and environmental racism. 
Speaker 1 
First hand. 
Speaker 1 
So using my platform and my privilege to organize these events, and again uplift the voices of those who really really. 
 
Yes. 
Speaker 1 
I mean deal with this. 
Speaker 2 
Right it's interesting you say that there's like this moment where it clicks and it sounds like for you, it was looking at? 
Speaker 2 
A very different picture of what you thought a coral reef was going to look like. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, so we've had. 
Speaker 2 
We've had similar experiences with North Shore Vibe where. 
Speaker 2 
Because of the affluence you've gone to some beaches on Lake MI that look beautiful. 
Speaker 2 
There's no trash and then you go to some different neighborhoods where all that trash and all that pollution seems to really pile in a very concentrated area and you start to dig a little bit deeper into what's going on there and you start reading that. 
Speaker 1 
Uh huh. 
Speaker 2 
There's 20,000,000+ pounds of waste that goes into the Lake. 
Speaker 2 
And if you don't live in a certain area, you don't experience the pain of what's going on with that, and it's which is a big reason of why North Shore Vibe likes doing beach cleanups and getting boots on the ground. 
Speaker 2 
So you came back to Evanston seeing this first hand and how did you figure out how to get involved? 
Speaker 2 
How did you was there groups that you already knew of? 
Speaker 2 
Could you go back to Google and figure out? 
Speaker 2 
How can I start applying this passion of mine? 
Speaker 1 
Oh yeah, so it was. 
Speaker 1 
I had gone summer of my freshman year, so when I returned back from my sophomore year in high school. 
Speaker 1 
I mean, I'm thankful to live in an area that prioritizes climate change more than others, so I definitely do not have to look far. Yeah, I definitely did not have to look forward to find like minded people and I really feel like I found those in E Town sunrise, which is not exactly an ETHS affiliated group as they are a little more geared towards civil disobedience. 
Speaker 2 
We have that going for us. 
Speaker 1 
But I I started going to more meetings and I started taking on more responsibilities and. 
Speaker 1 
Through connections with that I got in touch with CG, which is this in green or Evanston and I started like taking some more responsibility there and I mean everything is really interconnected so I was meeting more people and that was discussing more topics and it was kind of like the world. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
Open a little bit. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, there's really tight knit community. 
Speaker 1 
My Horizon group brought in, yeah. 
Speaker 2 
What it? 
Speaker 2 
So I've the sunrise movement the way that I understand it is. 
Speaker 2 
It's a group of. 
Speaker 2 
Very passionate young individuals who have this. 
Speaker 2 
Worry for what's coming because of climate change and are taking awesome action to start to fight that and push others to take action like you were doing with the Alderman and City Council. 
Speaker 2 
Talk to me a little bit more about the group and how you guys are led and the different initiatives you guys do within Evanston or even broader than that to try to get people more aware about these things that are going. 
 
Of course. 
Speaker 1 
On yeah, so the Sunrise movement has chapters across the US and it's just a. 
Speaker 1 
Group, I mean it's a movement of people younger than 35, usually fighting towards or fighting against climate change and trying to create millions of green jobs in the process and demanding federal and local officials for. 
Speaker 1 
Like the climate policy that we need and stressing the intersectionality of the climate movement in the process. 
Speaker 1 
So as it goes for events that e-town sunrises plan, we just recently headed. 
Speaker 1 
A mayoral town Hall centering the intersection of racial and climate justice with Evanston fight for Black Lives, which is a super super awesome organization and everything, so we interviewed Sebastian Nalls, Lori Keenan, and Daniel Biss all on various questions regarding racial justice and climate justice in Evanston, which was super super awesome. 
Speaker 1 
We've also planned a number of walkouts within ETHS. 
Speaker 1 
As well as. 
Speaker 2 
Oh yeah, tell me more about that. 
Speaker 1 
So actually I was not present for one of them. 
Speaker 1 
I had yet to join the leadership team for the for the Big one before we all had to leave, but. 
Speaker 1 
We all we leave ninth period and we walked to Fountain Square where we usually have a big protest with signs and we're demanding the attention of those around and local officials. 
Speaker 1 
And we also. 
Speaker 1 
This is, at least for the July 4th. 
Speaker 1 
Check out that we had this summer or last summer we all had. 
Speaker 1 
We had a big chunk out in Town Square writing messages about. 
Speaker 1 
How black lives really need to matter in Evanston and how we don't feel as though the city of Evanston has prioritized. 
Speaker 1 
Oh 
Speaker 1 
Racial justice in. 
Speaker 1 
I mean, at least not to the extent that they need to be right. 
Speaker 1 
And we marched to the Evanston Police Department afterwards and we displayed our. 
Speaker 1 
Displeasure there so. 
Speaker 2 
And what's the turn out for something like that? 
I imagine it's not hard to convince people to leave, not period of school, right? 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
And also then again, very thankful to being a little bit more of a. 
A little bit, just a little bit more of a progressive community and ETHS so people are more than willing to fight behind the cause, especially climate change in the intersection and the intersectionality of that. 
Speaker 1 
That's great. 
Speaker 2 
Thank you from our behalf for bringing light to the issues that are in play. 
But more importantly, taking action on it, that's awesome. So you mentioned ETHS that's come up quite a bit, which is Evanston Township High School. And I understand that you've also met with the principal at the high school and there's conversations going on about how the high school can become more green and more. 
Energy sufficient and sustainable? 
Speaker 2 
How are those conversations going? 
Speaker 1 
You know, at the end of the day, like I do. 
Speaker 1 
I don't, I don't. 
Speaker 1 
I think applaud is a big word, but I thank them for being a little bit more lenient in having those conversations. 
'cause I know peers who at their schools like aren't even able to have those conversations at all, but. 
Speaker 1 
I mean slowly but surely. Yeah, yeah, I. I think in regards to we had a big big Earth month plan right before Covid hit and we were able to have some really great conversations with one of our principles ETHS. But then again. 
Speaker 2 
A chipping away. 
Speaker 1 
Not nearly as much like action as we need, yeah, but. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
What do you think holds back the action 'cause I know you guys, you were at the City Council meeting because. 
 
CARP had been passed in 2018. There hadn't been enough action things in the school move a little slow as you got involved in this. 
 
Yeah. 
 
These are big changes, right? 
 
You're asking people to make big changes. 
Speaker 1 
Speaker 2 
What has been the learning from you about the process about how these big changes actually happen? 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
Sounds like one would be that it's slower than we would obviously like. 
Speaker 1 
Things take a long ass time and people are generally not geared towards understanding the extent to which the climate the climate crisis applies to everything 
Speaker 2 
Right? 
Speaker 1 
So when you're talking about climate, curriculum and like. 
 
I'm totally blanking, but like the need for renewable energies, TTHS an like plastic water bottles and like. 
 
Like the true implementation of composting in our cafeterias, it's kind of like people shut down a little bit because there's I mean it's really overwhelming so kind of approaching it in a manner that is. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
I know a little more simple. 
 
Yeah is probably the way to go. 
Speaker 2 
There. 
Speaker 2 
Because the changes are overwhelming for people to actually. 
 
Yeah, do and implement. 
Speaker 1 
And because there's so much to be done, great, right? 
Speaker 2 
So if you had, I'm curious, did you guys have any goals and maybe this is all changed with covid happening 'cause I know it's easier to get things done in person as it is over zoom. 
 
But near term and long term future plans, if you guys had goals for Evanston, what's the thing on the horizon? 
Speaker 2 
Is it quicker? 
Speaker 2 
Implementation of carp? 
Speaker 2 
Are there other things that are more pressing for you guys? 
Speaker 2 
What's on the radar right now? 
Speaker 1 
Definitely definitely. 
 
The implementation of carp and within Carp there's sort of a community outreach program that enables like. 
 
All Evanston residents to like really delve into what the climate crisis is and how it applies to them and like what Evanston services. 
 
They have to combat. It is something that I'm I really, really, really think we need. I mean, have I guarantee you that 75% of Evanston residents don't know what carp is right? And they don't know what the city of Evanston is doing to prepare for the climate crisis and how that applies to them. 
 
And I think that that aspect of implementing CARP is really really crucial. 
 
Secondly, like I said, a little bit earlier, climate curriculum both at DIG, both in District 202 and District 65, so having sustainability coordinators. 
 
Really like having a set curriculum too. 
 
I mean let. 
 
9th graders as well as second graders know that like this is. 
 
I mean, this is what we're dealing with and not really sugarcoating it an. 
Speaker 2 
Right? 
Speaker 1 
How they understand that? 
Speaker 1 
Again, this applies to everything and how they need to be equipped to deal with it, yeah? 
Speaker 2 
Here I was talking to my wife earlier about our interview AND. 
 
I used to coach basketball so and I still coach and do some tutoring. 
 
Actually in the Evanston system and some some schools in the city and what? 
 
What I love about Generation Z is that you guys First off have more access to information than any generation has ever had right? 
 
And you guys know how to use it. 
 
The smartphone in your hand or the tablet. 
 
Whatever you guys are using it has power and there's knowledge behind that. 
 
The next step of that is taking action off all that information and knowledge that you guys have. 
 
And when I came across your article and I started seeing more like that, a cross the Chicago area across the country. 
 
Think of people. 
 
Think of people like Greta Thornberg. 
Speaker 2 
 
Speaker 2 
These people who are so educated on the topic, passionate and then they're taking it to the next level to take change at such a young age. 
 
And I think something that is cool that you often hear about when someone meets an impressive high school student is, oh, they've got great potential. 
 
But people like you, you guys are already getting things done. 
 
It's not potential. 
 
You guys are moving the ball right now, and I'm curious. 
 
Speaking for you and other people your age when you're meeting with people that are older and are in positions where they have power because of their title. 
 
Do you guys feel like there's that mutual respect between what you guys are doing and despite the age you guys are doing it? 
 
Is there good conversation back and forth? 
 
And do you feel that your opinions are heard and well received and? 
Speaker 1 
Generally speaking, no. I. I think in like 85% of the interactions I've had with older officials, it's like constantly being written off as naive or too radical or just. 
Speaker 1 
Too young to really understand what we're talking about or what I'm talking about. 
Speaker 1 
And frankly, it's quite annoying. 
Speaker 2 
I can imagine. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, I mean. 
You feel like deeply, deeply connected to this work, so when we're told that we don't know what we're talking about and that this is something we should leave to adults. 
 
When we're the ones trying to hold them accountable, it's really, really irritating and. 
 
And. 
 
 
I think that. 
 
I mean like once in a blue moon I can have a conversation with. 
 
Like in Evanston, official who like even slightly understands where I'm coming from, but in terms of legitimate change. 
 
It's I mean again with the principle thing. 
Speaker 1 
It's like chipping away, but it's it's definitely a process. 
 
Right. 
Speaker 2 
Right? 
Speaker 2 
And from their perspective you know they've got the view, probably that. 
Speaker 2 
You talk about change being slow, and then I'm sure everybody loves the idea of composting from the cafeteria or finding renewable energy sources to power the building. 
Speaker 2 
As you get. 
Speaker 2 
Older and become an adult. 
Speaker 2 
I'm sure some of them have had such a bad experience is about trying to actually do good and change, and it was such a logistical nightmare that they hear these awesome projects come up and they're just like Oh my gosh, Can you imagine actually trying to figure out how to do that? 
Speaker 2 
Well, I think the great perspective that younger people bring, especially when they're knowledgeable and well researched. 
Speaker 2 
Is. 
Speaker 2 
That 
Speaker 2 
Sometimes it is just that simple, you just gotta go figure out how to do it and then these experiences of the world as people get older, kind of. 
Speaker 2 
I don't know, it just makes them feel like. 
Speaker 2 
There's going to be a lot of work involved in that, and I think that demotivates a lot of people to actually go out and do it, you know? 
Speaker 1 
Uh-huh yeah. 
Speaker 2 
Which is interesting. 
Speaker 2 
Well, Northshore viably we're happy to give you a platform. 
Speaker 2 
We're so glad you're here. 
Speaker 2 
And. 
Speaker 2 
People your age that love the environment. 
Speaker 2 
We love talking with you and anything we can ever do to help you guys. 
Speaker 2 
That's what we're here for. 
Speaker 1 
Well, thank you so much. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, so what's what's next for you? 
Speaker 2 
Personally, you're 17. 
Speaker 2 
You're a climate activist. 
Speaker 2 
You're making change here in Evanston. 
Speaker 2 
Do you have time to think about college and what you want to do as an adult? 
Speaker 2 
Is that too far away? 
Speaker 2 
Hey. 
Speaker 1 
Oh, you know? 
Speaker 1 
As for college, yeah, that's definitely the direction I'm going in. 
Speaker 1 
Unfortunately, while this weather is absolutely lovely, the Midwest is not my Forte. 
Speaker 1 
No, no. 
Speaker 2 
Really. 
Speaker 1 
Hey, don't like Michigan, but definitely looking more West Coast, yes? 
Speaker 2 
You want warmer. 
Speaker 2 
That's a fair. 
Speaker 2 
You and many other people, I think. 
Speaker 1 
Off 
Speaker 1 
So like having that that access to. 
Speaker 1 
Speaker 1 
More outdoorsy stuff is definitely definitely something I'm interested in, so I've been looking around like Pittser UC Santa Cruz University, Seattle, WA. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
Read Lewis and Clark schools like that, which also have really. 
Speaker 1 
Really, really good environmental studies and like marine studies programs and like oceanography, which is something I really interest. 
Speaker 1 
Pretty cool. 
Speaker 1 
 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
So yeah, that's something I would really love to do. 
Speaker 1 
As for after that, which is a ways away, so I'm not entirely sure you. 
Speaker 2 
Don't have the whole life plan mapped out yet. 
Speaker 1 
No, not just today. 
Speaker 2 
OK, good you got plenty of time for that. 
Speaker 1 
Unfortunately, there's this thing called woofing, which I think I have notes on it. 
Speaker 1 
I don't know what it is exactly like the acronym, but it's like something like worldwide organizing farming that stuff, wasn't it? 
 
Cap. 
Speaker 2 
Oh cool. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, but I'm. 
Speaker 2 
I'm not going to know the difference, so you can. 
Speaker 2 
Tell me whatever it is. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, so they send you basically. 
Speaker 1 
To any location across the world, in a farm and in exchange for work on the farm of the ranch, they provide you with room and board and you get like this really awesome experience and you get to experience wherever you are actually one of the the previous D Towns sunrise. 
Speaker 1 
Hub coordinator Bela Hubbard actually told me about it. 
Speaker 1 
She did a program in Costa Rica I've. 
Speaker 1 
And. 
Speaker 2 
So it's something you can do in. 
Speaker 1 
College yes, yeah, I think so. 
Speaker 1 
But it was she said it was absolutely amazing and it's something that I'm really interested in, yeah? 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, that sounds like it would be a great experience. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, do you have interest in agriculture? 
Speaker 1 
Definitely yeah. 
Speaker 1 
Definitely. 
Speaker 1 
 
Speaker 1 
Currently in urban agriculture at the high school, which is something I really really love, yeah. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
 
 
Very cool. 
Speaker 2 
So what is? 
Speaker 2 
When you got involved in this and you had the coral reef experience, that totally sounds like kind of rocked your world and opened your eyes to some of this stuff. 
Speaker 2 
Did you ever think you'd be involved in this? 
Speaker 2 
Political capacity and speaking in front of these people. 
Speaker 2 
The other remove yourself back and kind of think I'm a junior in high school and I'm in front of the principle I'm in front of the Alderman in Evanston. 
Speaker 2 
On 
Speaker 2 
 
Speaker 2 
Does that or does that just kind of seem like normal status quo for what you guys have been doing. 
Speaker 1 
Speaker 1 
Kind of like normal status quo. 
Speaker 1 
I mean, I feel like. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, I mean. 
Speaker 1 
It's kind of just like party everyday thing now. 
Speaker 2 
It is what it is now, right? 
Speaker 2 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
I mean having these conversations with BTHS administration and now Daniel this is marriage. 
Speaker 1 
Just something that's kind of. 
Speaker 1 
I don't know. 
Speaker 1 
Pardon my own schedule. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
Right and what are our feelings on on that? 
Speaker 2 
Uhm, 'cause I understand you were involved. 
Speaker 2 
In the mayoral race, correct? 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, just a bit. I helped a little bit on Daniel Biss's climate policy, but to be honest with you at the town Hall when I was. 
Speaker 1 
Helping interview the candidates, I really, really thought that Sebastian Niles was very well spoken and very articulate, and I thought that what his plans were for Evanston were really, really inspiring. 
Speaker 1 
And really. 
Speaker 1 
Achievable so that was and I thought that. 
Speaker 1 
Not no hate on Daniel or Lori. 
Speaker 1 
I thought their responses were a little bit similar. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, a little bit. 
Speaker 1 
Not as radical as we. 
Speaker 2 
Needed politician yeah yeah an is is Daniel Biss. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
Is he optimistic with climate change? 
Speaker 2 
Where was kind of his stance on moving forward with carp and some of the other initiatives that he temp sunrise has been pushing. 
Speaker 1 
Well. 
Speaker 1 
So with all the candidates, definitely all four. 
Speaker 1 
Furthering carp implementation and doing it at a faster rate than we have been. 
Speaker 1 
Yes, I'm very thankful for you. 
Speaker 1 
Tom Sunrise has yet to have talks with him, but I'm sure that is something that will happen in the very near future. 
Speaker 1 
But As for the implementation of climate, curriculum and. 
Speaker 1 
I mean everything that goes under carp. 
Speaker 1 
I get to talk to him about it, but I wouldn't. 
Speaker 1 
I definitely think it's something that he's willing to talk about and further discuss. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
That's good. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
So when we. 
Speaker 2 
Do North Shore Vibe and we talk about trying to be good to the environment the way that we activate people is we try to get people out to a beach clean up and we can talk to him about. 
 
Uh huh? 
Speaker 2 
What we see in terms of pollution going in and then once people actually start digging around the beach a little bit and see how the plastic and paper goods and the beer bottles left out. 
Speaker 2 
That's really that experience where I think it settles into people that this is a problem. 
Speaker 2 
Right? 
Speaker 2 
 
Speaker 2 
So I'm curious from your perspective whether it's something eastown sunrise related or just educating Evanston or North Shore residents. 
Speaker 2 
More on what's going on in the area if you had one, ask of them or. 
Speaker 2 
One piece of advice on go to this website to read more about. 
Speaker 2 
X or Y or Z. 
Speaker 2 
What would that ask me if? 
Speaker 2 
You could choose just one thing. 
Speaker 1 
Oh man. 
Speaker 2 
And it's probably hard to get. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
It just down to one. 
Speaker 1 
I might have to go with like 1 1/2 ask. 
Speaker 2 
OK, one and a half there. 
Speaker 2 
We can deal with. 
Speaker 1 
That one, like I said earlier, listen to listen to your kids. 
Speaker 1 
We know. 
Speaker 1 
I mean, at least to some extent we know what we're talking about, and it's really, really difficult when we are the generation that is going to bear the brunt of this crisis. 
 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
Yet we're not the ones being listened to. 
Speaker 1 
And we have so much information and again we are so deeply connected to this work that. 
Speaker 1 
Like we have **** to say an if you give us some time to sit down at the dinner table and discuss for like 20 minutes what is going on and how it applies to you and how you can help, it will certainly make a difference. 
 
Right. 
Speaker 1 
Secondly, this is the half part. 
Speaker 1 
No shame in the individual action game. 
Speaker 1 
While it is definitely crucial to acknowledge that the elite few an leaders of these huge corporations that are exploiting the environment are to blame for this crisis. 
Speaker 1 
On 
Speaker 1 
Buying sustainably 
Speaker 1 
Like choosing to biker carpool when you have the opportunity, Anne really just everything that goes under that category is good. 
Speaker 1 
But then again. 
Speaker 1 
Within that conversation is the aspect of Accessibility in the environmental movement, which is a whole other conversation on its own right, but yeah. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
 
Speaker 2 
And just so people know, I did not ask Lily to just plug eco friendly apparel from North Shore via that just naturally came up. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 2 
So kudos to Lily for making that transition. 
Speaker 2 
Before I got, I've got a question I want to end with, but before we get there. 
Speaker 2 
You mentioned big corporations and individuals at the top who are more worried about. 
Speaker 2 
Padding their corporate profits as opposed to. 
Speaker 2 
Making sure that the Earth is going to be beautiful for the next 5 to 10 generations. 
Speaker 2 
I was thinking about. 
Speaker 2 
The planet last night and how people have different views of the planet and I think. 
 
Right. 
Speaker 2 
A lot of those corporations, and maybe the individuals don't view it this way, but the Corporation views it this way they view it as a resource, something that is at their disposal that they have the right to use whenever they want, and if it's there, they should take it. 
Speaker 2 
I was thinking little differently. 
Speaker 2 
That planet is a gift. 
Speaker 2 
Earth is a gift to be shared by everyone. 
Speaker 2 
And before you take. 
Speaker 2 
Any action as if you're getting a shared gift, there's consideration that has to happen of what's the impact of this going to be on Lily on other people in Evan? 
Speaker 2 
And I think your generation really has that consideration. 
Speaker 2 
I'm curious, is there what did I get wrong in that? 
Speaker 2 
I'm curious if you view the planet the same way or if your generation has any thoughts on how you actually view taking advantage. 
Speaker 2 
I'm looking at the Lake right now, taking advantage of all the beauty there is here. 
Speaker 2 
An versus other people that just view it as a resource for their personal or Corporation gain. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, I I definitely agree with a lot of that. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah. 
Speaker 1 
 
Speaker 1 
Honestly, off the top of my head, I can't find anything wrong with what you said, but I think understanding. 
Speaker 1 
The role that environmental racism and like colonialism an just like American. 
Speaker 1 
Like 
Speaker 1 
Expansion has to do with, like the trauma that has caused. 
Speaker 1 
By POC and how it's, I mean there. 
Speaker 1 
Like at the forefront of this. 
Speaker 2 
Right? 
Speaker 1 
And we need to prioritize. 
Speaker 1 
Their well being. 
Speaker 1 
Ann 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, that's I could have worded that better, but that's all I got this moment. 
Speaker 2 
That's good. 
Speaker 2 
Now that was a good sum up. 
Speaker 2 
So before we end things away, this is a fun question. 
Speaker 2 
We like to ask people about if they have one favorite restaurant in the Evanston Northshore area Favorite Coffee Shop. 
Speaker 2 
I'm curious if anything comes to mind for you, for. 
Speaker 2 
If you gotta go to spot. 
Speaker 2 
What's that going to be? 
Speaker 1 
Course restaurant wise. Gotta go with AL's deli no. 
Speaker 2 
Hesitation you're ready for that one. 
Speaker 1 
Never. 
Speaker 1 
So talk to me about Alicedale, how's that? 
Speaker 1 
The cute little French sandwich place right next to the Piven Theater, which is on noise St best sandwiches in town, guaranteed. 
Speaker 1 
Personally, both are. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, what what? 
Speaker 2 
What should we get when we go there? 
Speaker 1 
They've got a bunch of options, but my personal favorite roast beef sandwich on a baguette, lettuce, tomato, onion, no Mayo or mayonnaise. 
Speaker 1 
Little bit of Brie and then Joes Green tea on the side is my go to. 
Speaker 2 
Wow, that was not specific at all. 
Speaker 1 
But you can switch it up a little bit and then coffee shop right next door. 
Speaker 1 
Coffee lab OK. 
Speaker 1 
Open palatte yeah uh-huh grab and go sort of situation. 
Speaker 2 
So you like to keep it all on the same street? 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, I like that. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, what are you getting from? 
Speaker 2 
Coffee lab. 
Speaker 1 
Uhm? 
Speaker 1 
Oat milk Chai, probably the largest size, no shame, yeah yeah, and then they have these little peanut butter cookies love'em. 
Speaker 2 
As big as you can get. 
Speaker 1 
Also, maybe if it's a morning they get scones from great harvest, Yep. 
Speaker 1 
Which blueberry is the way to go? 
Speaker 2 
What's your take on the Evanston bakery competition? 'cause there's a lot of good bakeries in Evanston. There's great harvest. There's Hume. There's a couple others up on central Bennison's 
 
Ha ha. 
Speaker 1 
Benefits. 
Speaker 1 
Tags Oh no. 
Speaker 2 
Do you have a? 
Speaker 2 
Like how do you decide which one to? 
Speaker 1 
Go to, you know I have a hard. 
Speaker 1 
Time with that, yeah. 
Speaker 1 
Great harvest, you know. 
Speaker 1 
I think they're all good for their own reasons. 
Speaker 1 
Yeah, great harvest. 
Speaker 1 
Apple scrapple. 
Speaker 1 
Definitely definitely up there. 
Speaker 1 
But as it goes through like good loaf of sourdough, I've got to go with. 
Speaker 2 
You and him. 
Speaker 2 
I mean, there's a reason the line is out the door every time you walk by, and it's 'cause it's good. 
Speaker 1 
Uh huh. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, it's very good. 
Speaker 1 
Any what? 
Speaker 2 
All right, I'm with you. You heard at AL's Diner. 
Speaker 1 
Else Delhi as Delhi got it coffee. 
Speaker 2 
Lab, that's the recommendation. 
Speaker 2 
Very thank you so much for coming on North Shore buy presents and even more importantly, thank you for what you're doing for our environment, our community pushing a green earth with diversity and thinking about all the right people. 
Speaker 2 
I'm really honored to have you on the show this morning, so thanks for joining us. 
Speaker 1 
Thank you so much. 
Speaker 1 
This is so awesome. 
Speaker 2 
Yeah, in North Shore Bob is here for you. 
Speaker 2 
And when you guys need us, awesome. 
Speaker 1 
Will definitely keep that in mind, thank you. 
Speaker 2 
Alright thanks Lily.